ENTEROIMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM

CCIM welcomes parents interested in using our Enteroimmunology program to improve the health of their children. We see pediatric patients with autoimmune illness, obesity, unusual symptoms, frequent infections. Our approach is to resolve symptoms by treating and resolving dysbiotic gut inflammation. Contact us today for more details! 888 250 CCIM

INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE SERVICES NOT COVERED BY INSURANCE

Covered by CCIM Integrative copays and out-of-pocket charges

Access to naturopathic therapies
Food & nutritional intake, history and assessment and meal plan
Psychospiritual & emotional intake, history, assessment, and recommendations
Extensive time spent with physician
Multi-system based specialization offered by physician (endocrinology, gastroenterology, functional medicine, mind-body medicine, etc)
Regular secured email access
Opportunity for secured texting access
Integrative Alchemy and Clinical Yogatherapy services
Access to Wellness services
Information packets, printouts, background information
Facilitation of Genova Lab diagnostic services
Test kit fees
Access to rapid-fire communication between physician & pharmacist
Access to customized compounded & naturopathic therapies
Access to telemedicine services (phone / Skype consultations)
Customized protocols & assessment letters
Minimal to no wait time
Boutique experience of the office visit
Access to contracted practitioners (trainers, nutritionists, holistic practitioners)
Access to home-based IV therapies
Access to CCIM trademarked programs
Access to Membership program
Access to cutting edge therapies unavailable to the community outside of CCIM patients

ANNOUNCING THE CCIM MERCURY TESTING & DETOXIFICATION PROGRAM

AT THIS TIME AVAILABLE ONLY TO PALM DESERT, CA AND COLUMBIA, MD PATIENTS

Phase 1: Diagnostics

Quicksilver Scientific Mercury Tri-Test (blood/urine/hair testing):

· Checks inorganic mercury (mercury salts that come from mercury vapor from dental amalgams) levels

· Checks ethyl/methyl mercury (comes from vaccines and fish protein)

· Tests your body’s capacity to excrete mercury

Cellular Health (Genova ONE) testing to check tissue glutathione/ALA/antioxidant levels

Stool testing (Genova GI Effects) to check for gastrointestinal dysbiosis / leaky gut syndrome

Insurance issues: PPO insurance (BCBS, United Healthcare, Cigna, but not Aetna) and Medicare covers Genova testing, but not Quicksilver testing.

Non-covered costs:

Mercury Tri-Test: $399

Test kit fees: $50/kit

Phase 2: Customized Therapeutic Detoxification Program

Features:

· Customized Detox nutritional meal planning

· GI Detox & Restoration Program

· Therapeutic Replacement of Glutathione, anti-oxidant, and alpha-lipoic acid

· Promotes Phase II Detoxification pathways

· Promotes Phase III excretion and prevents reabsorption of captured mercury

· Resolves Chronic inflammation from gastrointestinal disturbances (leaky gut)

· Totally naturopathic protocol (no side effects)

Timeline: 3 and 6 month protocols offered, depending on the complexity of the case

Insurance issues: Insurance coverage does not apply to the therapies, unfortunately. Therapeutic protocols are customized, so costs vary person to person

WELCOME TO 2017!

In celebrating the holidays with our loved ones while practicing our shared commitment towards wellness, we integrate both a useful common sense and broad understanding of our times. It’s now when we can discard obsolete practices, recall the essential truths, while benefitting from cutting edge information and scientific research. In the context of health, that means we need to be steadfast in understanding of the value and urgency of cultivating a strong immune system, considering what we now know about the microbiome in 2017.

Capability of handling the foreign particles and pathogens around us, while not over-reacting in autoimmune, allergic, or chronically inflamed cycles are signs of the strong immune system. Ever vigilant to the signs of tissue damage and consequent bacterial invasion, the tissues and cells of the immune system are located mostly along the gastrointestinal tract, where the microbiome bacteria mostly are located. The cell of the GI tract, therefore are very important. Enterocytes, or intestinal cells, are greatly affected by the products of metabolic activity of gut bacteria and viruses. It therefore behooves us to cultivate the healthy gastrointestinal lining and eubiosis (healthy ecology) among the bacteria in our gut. Eubiosis leads to harmony and a healthy immune system, by leading to physiologically healthy enterocytes and colonocytes (cells of the GI tract).

Everything we consume gets digested and absorbed by our gastrointestinal cells OR metabolized by the gut bacteria (which far outnumber human cells). Therefore, our actions and life circumstances provide opportunity to establish eubiosis. We can for example consume resistant starches, amino acids (such as tryptophan), hormones (such as Vitamin D), and vitamins (such as Vitamin A) which increase gut bacterial diversity, improve gut bacterial cell healthy and longevity, and therefore help create healthy immune system reactivity and responsiveness.

The future is here; the concept of the superorganism (our human individuality plus our gut bacterial ecology) is here, and our understanding of ourselves in that equation will determine our well-being and therefore vitality and quality of life.

Dushyant Viswanathan, MD

Jan 1 2017

WHAT? DO YOU MEAN THAT THE ILLNESS I’VE BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH CAN BE REVERSED?? YES!

By Dr. DV, Dushyant Viswanathan, MD, ABIM, ABOIM, AACE

CCIM Medical Director

My heart goes out to all people who are struggling with daily symptoms, physical complaints, illnesses, which if they’ve been going on for longer than 3 months, I’d call chronic. Sometimes people find themselves in the hospital with an acute exacerbation of a chronic illness, or they find themselves in the hospital being diagnosed with a serious illness even though they had no prior complaints. It happens every day, and it usually is very scary and anxiety-provoking.

People in this situation want to “get better,” and this is the fundamental intention behind whatever treatment plan their doctors or the medical system provide. Doctors usually provide statistics from clinical trials to substantiate a decision to provide a treatment, but CANNOT promise that a patient will “get better.” Nor is the concept of disease reversal ever discussed with patients in the mainstream medical setting. Again, even the experience with doctors is usually confusing, anxiety-provoking, and scary.

Typically the treatment plan involves surgery, drugs, radiotherapy (for cancer), devices (such as pacemakers, prosthetics, etc.), or extensive physical rehabilitation programs. These treatments each are developed by multi-million dollar industries, and are substantiated by clinical trials that occur in very controlled settings. Doctors essentially match a treatment to a disease, and facilitate the execution of the treatment.

Yet the fact of the matter is that with very few exceptions, most patients do not “get better.” Even if one illness (such as cancer) improves, another one (such as heart failure, pneumonia, etc) manifests soon thereafter. Too many people suffer this way- one thing after another. The reason this happens is because simply matching a technology-driven treatment to a disease isn’t enough to address the complicated and nuanced aspects of human physiology and pathology.

All of this sounds like bad news. Very depressing. However, I come as the bearer of good news. What I want the reader to know is that many diseases are reversible. Not just be on medications for life. Not that. What I mean is that the illness can go away. This is about possibility-driven thinking.

There is a process that led to the illness in the first place, and there is a process that leads to the healing. It is that simple. My patients see themselves as dynamic participants in their experience, in their medical care, rather than as static sufferers doomed from the start. When we complete a diagnostic workup and we understand the causes of symptoms, then our next step is to say,

“Well, the good news is, this is totally reversible. Let’s talk about how to do that.”

When my patients hear this, they find it a natural response to the problems they are experiencing. All medical conditions are either reversible or irreversible. An experienced doctor will be able to communicate without delay whether a particular clinical condition is reversible or not. In my case, as an internal medicine physician who specializes in enteroimmunology and endocrinology for patients in the community, in the hospital, in nursing homes, and at home, I identify immediately whether a medical condition is reversible or not. And then I proceed getting to work helping a patient reverse their illness.

You, as a patient, can have this conversation, in fact, you must! Make your physician accountable for this, and seek out the reversibility of illness now! That opportunity is available to you now!

It is because I can have this conversation, engage this journey, with my patients that I love my work as a doctor so much. I see other doctors watch their patients slowly deteriorate over time, mostly because there is no plan of action addressing reversing the illness; meanwhile my patients’ health visibly improves; they not only get to the point having no symptoms but also achieve their health goals. I speak at conferences presenting my patient cases as examples of how to reverse illness.

The culture we create with our patients isn’t about aggressive treatments to destroy illness; rather, it is about intelligently and with a nuanced sensibility optimizing physiology, leading to improved organ function, eradication of inflammation, improved metabolism, and improved vitality and lifestyle. As a side effect of improving and optimizing the immune system, illness/symptoms go away, and wellness persists. Why the American public doesn’t expect treatments to reverse the underlying causes of illness is something that I still do not understand. Thankfully there are physicians available committed to exactly this. That is the only medical treatment I would want for my family and loved ones.

Dushyant Viswanathan, MD, ABIM, ABOIM, AACE
21900 Burbank Blvd. #300 Woodland Hills, CA 91367
10320 Little Patuxent Pkwy Ste. 200 Columbia, MD 21044
74075 El Paseo # B2, Palm Desert, CA 92260
1-888-250-CCIM
1-844-233-7639 (f)
ether@ccimhealth.com
ccimhealth.com

I FINALLY FOUND MY DR. RIGHT

By Maria Aparis

Search the web and you will find plenty of sites on how to find your perfect match. Turn on the TV and you will find many shows with advice on how to meet that person of your dreams. Everywhere you look these days you can find information on how to find your one true beloved.

According to one dating site you should:

1. Don’t wait for him to come to you

2. Spend some time thinking about what you want

3. Accentuate what is wonderful about you

4. Don’t be afraid to approach him

I love the fact that we put so much thought into what our heart needs and wants as this is a huge part of our overall health and wellness however, when it comes to finding a physician or what I rather like to call my health partner, we fall short on spending the time to find THE ONE that matches our needs.

So, lets use the above dating advice and use it to help us find our Dr. Right.

1. Don’t wait for him to come to you.

This is actually great advice! Don’t wait for a medical emergency to find your Dr. Right. You could end up making a bad relationship choice just because he/she was there and you needed them at the time. We all know breakups can be awkward so it’s best to avoid them in the first place.

2. Spend some time thinking about what you want

What kind of doctor are you looking for? What specialty? Male? Female? Does it matter how close their practice is to where you live? How accessible is he/she? How many years have they been in practice? Are they a pill pusher or do they really care about your health and want to find out exactly what could be going on with your body? I went on plenty of doctor referral blind dates set up by my friends only to find that the doctor was not for me.

3. Accentuate what is wonderful about you

When you have that first meeting it is really important to have time to get to know each other. This is a great time to really talk about you. Your eating habits, how much you exercise, how hands-on you are with your health and what your vision is on your healthcare and how you both can work together to develop your game plan. If the doctor is rushing you out of the room to get to the next patient or has a prescription pad in hand before you even sit down then this should be a fish that is thrown back into the sea!

4. Don’t be afraid to approach him/her

Often times I have heard from my clients that they accept the doctor’s advice without any questions and take every pill they prescribe without any thought as to what complications could arise from it. Take caution with this, as there are many prescriptions out there that cause more harm than good. Please ask questions. The doctors are there to provide you with a service, a service to keep you healthy. If they feel you need a prescription make sure you ask them about the side effects, how long you will need to take it and if there are any natural alternatives that could work as well. This is your life; you get to be in charge of what is right for you.

For me it was a bit like Goldie Locks and the 3 Bears. One wasn’t a match for me because he was too busy to move on to the next patient and let me walk out of his office with extreme anemia! Another one wasn’t right because she wanted me to take her endless bottles of supplements, which never worked. Another was so far away that it took me hours just to see him and when I did have an appointment he was always running late.

My Dr. Right actually found me! Hard to believe but he reached out to me to get information on essential oils! He had me at hello! He wanted to incorporate the essential oils into his practice! Now this was a doctor I had to get to know. I hope you are sitting down as you read this because what I am about to tell you will shock you.

There is a place called The Columbia Center for Integrative Medicine, CCIM for short and it is the heart and soul of what I believe to be true health care at its finest. As a patient you will first meet with their Wellness Director, the lovely and astute Elaina Holland who reviews your health history. She will ask you comprehensive questions that lead right up to why you are there. This initial encounter will take approximately 30 minutes.

Elaina then preps Dr. Dushyant Viswanathan, Dr. DV for short, who is the Chief Medical Director of CCIM. Dr. DV is best described as young, hip and cool with an old soul. You get the feeling that you are meeting with the elder of an ancient tribe yet who’s thinking is cutting edge in all things medical. You will then have a full comprehensive visit with Dr. DV which can take anywhere between 2 to 4 hours. You will have the time to discuss details of your medical history and what your current health challenges are. You get his full-undivided attention for as long as it takes for him to assess which tests are needed to best serve you.

What I personally find so appealing is that his tests aren’t just the ordinary blood test. He will order saliva tests, hair samples and stool tests. All of these are high on my list as they give you the right kind of data that you need to accomplish real results in your health.

Once your tests are back, you will sit down with Dr. DV and Elaina to develop your plan. Dr. DV specializes in Functional Medicine, this means that he looks at your body as an interconnected system. Instead of the Dr. who specializes in just one area, Dr. DV looks into your entire system and like a detective he searches for all clues until he finds exactly what is wrong. He also will recommend healthy alternatives to pharmaceuticals and only prescribes pharma for a short time until the condition is corrected and only if it is absolutely necessary. Together, as a team you will embark on a health journey like no other as they correct food issues, recommend yoga postures, breathing exercises, affirmations and mantras, and say things like “get a weekly massage” and meditate.

They are the self proclaimed “most detailed medical service in the world” and I have to say I agree with them. They offer a monthly membership for $550 and if you would like that membership to include house calls its $750. It may sound pricey to some but when you get customized health care that will even come to your home the price becomes invaluable. After all, what do you have if you don’t have your health?

REVERSING ILLNESS

My heart goes out to all people who are struggling with daily symptoms, physical complaints, illnesses, which if they’ve been going on for longer than 3 months, I’d call chronic. Sometimes people find themselves in the hospital with an acute exacerbation of a chronic illness, or they find themselves in the hospital being diagnosed with a serious illness even though they had no prior complaints. It happens every day, and it usually is very scary and anxiety-provoking.

People in this situation want to “get better,” and this is the fundamental intention behind whatever treatment plan their doctors or the medical system provide. Doctors usually provide statistics from clinical trials to substantiate a decision to provide a treatment, but CANNOT promise that a patient will “get better.” Again, even the experience with doctors is usually confusing, anxiety-provoking, and scary.

Typically the treatment plan involves surgery, drugs, radiotherapy (for cancer), devices (such as pacemakers, prosthetics, etc.), or extensive physical rehabilitation programs. These treatments each are developed by multi-million dollar industries, and are substantiated by clinical trials that occur in very controlled settings. Doctors essentially match a treatment to a disease, and facilitate the execution of the treatment.

Yet the fact of the matter is that with very few exceptions, most patients do not “get better.” Even if one illness (such as cancer) improves, another one (such as heart failure, pneumonia, etc) manifests soon thereafter. Too many people suffer this way- one thing after another. The reason this happens is because simply matching a technology-driven treatment to a disease isn’t enough to address the complicated and nuanced aspects of human physiology and pathology.

Integrative Medicine purports to be the solution to this basic flaw of the medical system. It is characteristic of many specialists in integrative and functional medicine such as myself (I am an integrative internal medicine specialist) to focus on each person in a unique context. When we complete a diagnostic workup and we understand the causes of symptoms, then our next step is to say,

“Now let’s talk about reversing or resolving the underlying causes of the symptoms.”

It is because I can have this conversation, engage this journey, with my patients that I love my work as a doctor so much. I see other doctors watch their patients slowly deteriorate over time, while my patients’ health visibly improves; they not only get to the point having no symptoms, but also achieve their health goals. The culture we create with our patients isn’t about aggressive treatments to destroy illness; rather, it is about intelligently and with a nuanced sensibility optimizing physiology, leading to improved organ function, eradication of inflammation, improved metabolism, and improved vitality and lifestyle. As a side effect of improving and optimizing the immune system, illness/symptoms go away, and wellness persists.

-Dr DV

CCIM TODAY JOINS THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS (AACE)

CCIM today joins the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and offers specialist service in hormone balancing for endocrine disorders such as hypogonadism (low testosterone), obesity, metabolic syndrome, dysmenorrhea, menorrhagia, dysfuntional nonmalignant uterine bleeding, premenstrual disorder, post-partum syndrome, adrenal fatigue and insufficiency (hypocortisolism or hypercortisolism), diabetes, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, hypothyroidism, and Hashimoto thyroiditis

MY AFFIDAVIT

It is with utmost humility that I accept the privilege to be of service, providing medical care for you. My work and intent is to provide sustainable, lasting solutions leading to true healing, by addressing and resolving the underlying causes of illness; once this is achieved, coherent strategies aimed at longevity and optimization of health are implemented.

I am grateful to CCIM for providing me a platform by which my protocols can be of service, and I am grateful to you to be given an opportunity to be of service.

CCIM makes use of a wide range of tools (pharmaceutical, compounded, naturopathic, lifestyle, nutritional, mind-body) in the creation of customized treatment programs after exhaustive diagnostic testing. The cardinal rule firstly is to do no harm, and secondly is to be effective.

Dushyant Viswanathan, MD

3/14/16

CLINICAL YOGATHERAPY REVERSES ATHEROSCLEROSIS (CLOGGED ARTERIES)

REVERSAL OF EARLY ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN METABOLIC SYNDROME BY YOGA ? A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a clustering of risk factors is highly prevalent throughout the world especially in South Asians [1] and is a strong risk factor for Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) and type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) [1–3]. The definition of metabolic syndrome as modified for the south Asians is by the following criteria [2].
1. Central Obesity (defined as waist circumference = 90 cms for males and = 80 cms forfemales)
2. Raised triglyceride level = 150 mg/dL.
3. Reduced HDL<40 mg in males and <50 mg in females
4. Raised blood pressure systolic blood pressure = 130 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure = 85 mmHg and
5. Raised fasting plasma glucose = 100 mg/dL.
Three out of five criteria have to be present to define the metabolic syndrome.
Though lifestyle modifications like physical activity, diet and weight reduction have been shown to be beneficial in MetS, the effects of yoga, a mind body technique have not been adequately studied. Yoga is a holistic lifestyle and includes not only physical postures (asanas), breathing exercises (Pranayamas), meditation but also emphasizes on vegetarian diet, tobacco cessation and stress control. Yoga has been reported to be beneficial for control of risk factors of CHD (like hypertension, diabetes, obesity, lipids and stress) [4–6], regression of advanced coronary atherosclerosis [7–9] and secondary prevention of CHD [10]. The objective of the present study was to determine whether yoga can regress the progression of early atherosclerosis in MetS [11].
Materials and Methods
One hundred consecutive apparently healthy individuals of either sex and diagnosed as MetS by modified criteria for south Asians [2] were included in this prospective randomized controlled trial. Patients in the control group (n=50) were prescribed the conventional lifestyle modifications (exercise, diet, smoking cessation) while the yoga group (n=50) were prescribed yogic exercises, in addition as described below. The patients were selected from the Executive Health Checkup of Sir Ganga Ram Hospital and a written informed consent was taken. The project was cleared by the Ethical committee of the institution. At baseline detailed clinical assessment, biochemical profile and cIMT measurements were performed by B mode ultrasound utilizing the standard methodology [9]. The patients were followed up for 1 year with repeated assessments. At the end of one year, they again underwent detailed clinical examination, biochemical tests and cIMT measurement by the same methodology. The baseline characteristics of the two groups did not differ significantly (Table 1) except for slightly high Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP) in the yoga group.
Yogic Exercises
After inclusion in the yoga group, patients underwenttraining in various yogic exercises by a trained yoga instructor for one week after which they were instructed to continue these practices daily for about 60 min daily. The yogic practices that were followed in the study have been reported by us earlier [8] and were as follows:
1. Health rejuvenating exercises–these exercises are aimed mainly at improving the general tone and flexibility of various parts of the body. These were also performed during warming up and to prepare for the next step, i.e. the Asanas.
2. Breathing exercises (Pranayamas) (Anulom Vilom–alternate nose breathing, Nadi Shodhana pranayam).
3. Asanas: these are the yogic postures and exercises mainly aimed at stretch relaxation. A number of asanas were taught including Surya Namaskar, Tadasana, Padahastasana, Vajrasana, Shasankasana, Ardha-matsyendrasana, Paschimottanasana, Bhujangasana, Dhanush ban asana, Shalabhasana, Uttanpadasana, Merudandasana, Pawanmuktasana, Sarvangasana, Matsyasana, Ardha matsyasana. The details of these asanas can be found in standard texts on yogic exercises.
4. Relaxation exercises (Kayotsarg or Corpse Posture) – A method of complete relaxation and preparation of body and mind for meditation. The literal meaning of Kayotsarg is to drop the body. In practice it is the conscious suspension of all gross movements of the body. As a result the muscles relax and the person becomes as restful as in sleep.
5. Preksha Dhyana – Preksha means perception and Dhyana means concentration. Preksha Dhyana is performed in the sitting position and the person first relaxes the body using Kayotsarg. Then he concentrates on the breath and gradually reduces the rate of breathing from 15-17/minute to 10-12/minute. With practice, the rate may be reduced even to 4-6/minute. By concentrating on the breath, the mental activity is controlled and the mind is prevented from being distracted.
In addition, they were advised to follow a low fat vegetarian diet, do moderate aerobic exercises and stop tobacco use.
Patients visited the yoga centre every month for monitoring and evaluation. The compliance as reported by the patients themselves was recorded. The compliance was defined as the percentage of total yogic exercises done at least five days a week.
Results
81 patients (43 controls and 34 in the yoga group) completed the study for one year. 19 patients were lost to follow up mostly because of inability to continue to study due to personal reasons. The compliance of the patients as reported by them in the yoga group was 75 ± 12%.
There was a significant reduction in BMI, WC, LDL, Tg, FBS, HbA1C, SBP and DBP and increase in HDL in both the groups (Table 2), but when compared with control, yoga group had a significant greater decrease in BMI, WC, LDL and SBP levels and increase in HDL. The cIMT decreased significantly in the yoga group whereas there was no significant change in cIMT in the control group. Univariate analysis of change in metabolic variables and change in cIMT in the study group showed that the reduction in waist circumference and HbA1C change correlated significantly with reduction in cIMT at the end of follow up.
Discussion
Our results on chemical and biochemical parameters of metabolic change are consistent with other studies of the effect of yoga/meditation in MetS [12–15]. Khatri et al. [12] reported in a randomized trial those 3 months yogic therapy resulted in a significant improvement in WC, SBP, DBP, fasting blood sugar, HbA1C, serum triglycerides and increase in HDL level. This study however included patient withknown type II DM. Paul-Labrador et al. [15] reported that 16 weeks of practice of transcendental meditation (TM) led to a significant reduction in insulin resistance which is considered as the basisof metabolic syndrome.
Our study also shows that the early atherosclerosis (which is often present in MetS) as assessed by cIMT is significantly reduced by 1 year practice of yoga as compared to controls (Figure 1). cIMT has been considered to be a surrogate marker for CHD [16], suggesting that yoga may help in reversal of early coronary heart disease. Another small
pilot trial in high risk older subjects demonstrated that after 9 months of multimodality natural medicine program including TM. cIMT was significantly reduced [17]. Three other randomized studies utilizing coronary angiography in patients with advanced CHD have also shown a regression of obstructive atherosclerotic lesions by yoga/meditation [7–9].
The mechanisms underlying the regression of early atherosclerosis in MetS by yoga are not clear from our study. Control of several risk factors like hypertension, type II DM lipids [4–10]. Reversal or preventive effects of both psychosocial and oxidative stress and reduction of inflammation [18–21] may be contributing factors. Further studies are needed to delineate the exact mechanisms.
Our study has several limitations. Relatively small number of patients has been studied and there have been 19% dropouts. By the nature of interventions involved, the study could not be blinded, hence a placebo effect of yoga intervention could not be excluded. The compliance of yoga practices was reported by patients themselves and not directly observed by the investigators. However despite these limitations, outcome variables in the two groups are significantly different and are likely to be clinically important.
Conclusion
On the basis of this randomized controlled trial, we conclude that addition of yoga to the conventional therapy in patients with MetS resulted in a significant reduction of early atherosclerosis as assessed by cIMT. In addition, yoga has additional significant effect on lipids, BMI and blood pressure. Yoga may be a cost effective technique to target multiple risk factors for heart disease and type II DM prevention. Though larger trials are required, it is suggested that yoga may be incorporated in the therapeutic lifestyle modifications for metabolic syndrome as well as CHD and type II DM.
References
Misra A, Vikram NK (2002) Insulin resistance syndrome (metabolic syndrome) and Asian Indians. Curr Sci 83: 1483-1496.
Enas EA, Mohan V, Deepa M, Farooq S, Pazhoor S, et al. (2007) The metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia among Asian Indians: a population with high rates of diabetes and premature coronary artery disease. J Cardiometab Syndr 2: 267-275
Ford ES (2005) Risks for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes associated with the metabolic syndrome: a summary of the evidence. Diabetes Care 28: 1769-1778.
Schmidt T, Wijga A, Von Zur Mühlen A, Brabant G, Wagner TO (1997) Changes in cardiovascular risk factors and hormones during a comprehensive residential three month kriya yoga training and vegetarian nutrition. Acta Physiol Scand Suppl 640: 158-162.
Mahajan AS, Reddy KS, Sachdeva U (1999) Lipid profile of coronary risk subjects following yogic lifestyle intervention. Indian Heart J 51: 37-40.
Bijlani RL, Vempati RP, Yadav RK, Ray RB, Gupta V, et al. (2005) A brief but comprehensive lifestyle education program based on yoga reduces risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. J Altern Complement Med 11: 267-274.
Ornish D, Brown SE, Scherwitz LW, Billings JH, Armstrong WT, et al. (1990) Can lifestyle changes reverse coronary heart disease? The Lifestyle Heart Trial. Lancet 336: 129-133.
Manchanda SC, Narang R, Reddy KS, Sachdeva U, Prabhakaran D, et al. (2000) Retardation of coronary atherosclerosis with yoga lifestyle intervention. J Assoc Physicians India 48: 687-694.
Gupta SK, Sawhney RC, Rai L, Chavan VD, Dani S, et al. (2011) Regression of coronary atherosclerosis through healthy lifestyle in coronary artery disease patients–Mount Abu Open Heart Trial. Indian Heart J 63: 461-469.
Schneider RH, Grim CE, Rainforth MV, Kotchen T, Nidich SI, et al. (2012) Stress reduction in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease: randomized, controlled trial of transcendental meditation and health education in Blacks. Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes 5: 750-758.
Riley WA, Barnes RW, Applegate WB, Dempsey R, Hartwell T, et al. (1992) Reproducibility of noninvasive ultrasonic measurement of carotid atherosclerosis. The Asymptomatic Carotid Artery Plaque Study. Stroke 23: 1062-1068.
Khatri D, Mathur KC, Gahlot S, Jain S, Agrawal RP (2007) Effects of yoga and meditation on clinical and biochemical parameters of metabolic syndrome. Diabetes Res Clin Pract 78: e9-e10.
Cohen BE, Chang AA, Grady D, Kanaya AM (2008) Restorative yoga in adults with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, controlled pilot trial. Metab Syndr Relat Disord 6: 223-229.
Innes KE, Bourguignon C, Taylor AG (2005) Risk indices associated with the insulin resistance syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and possible protection with yoga: a systematic review. J Am Board Fam Pract 18: 491-519.
Paul-Labrador M, Polk D, Dwyer JH, Velasquez I, Nidich S, et al. (2006) Effects of a randomized controlled trial of transcendental meditation on components of the metabolic syndrome in subjects with coronary heart disease. Arch Intern Med 166: 1218-1224.
Kuller LH, Shemanski L, Psaty BM, Borhani NO, Gardin J, et al. (1995) Subclinical disease as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Circulation 92: 720-726.
Fields JZ, Walton KG, Schneider RH, Nidich S, Pomerantz R, et al. (2002) Effect of a multimodality natural medicine program on carotid atherosclerosis in older subjects: a pilot trial of Maharishi Vedic Medicine. Am J Cardiol 89: 952-958.
Yadav RK, Ray RB, Vempati R, Bijlani RL (2005) Effect of a comprehensive yoga-based lifestyle modification program on lipid peroxidation. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol 49: 358-362.
Sinha S, Singh SN, Monga YP, Ray US (2007) Improvement of glutathione and total antioxidant status with yoga. J Altern Complement Med 13: 1085-1090.
Hartfiel N, Havenhand J, Khalsa SB, Clarke G, Krayer A (2011) The effectiveness of yoga for the improvement of well-being and resilience to stress in the workplace. Scand J Work Environ Health 37: 70-76.
Gordon LA, Morrison EY, McGrowder DA, Young R, Fraser YT, et al. (2008) Effect of exercise therapy on lipid profile and oxidative stress indicators in patients with type 2 diabetes. BMC Complement Altern Med 8: 21.